Brandon Dentist | 813-324-2834 https://brandon.dental Brandon.dental care, advice, and resources for optimal oral hygiene. Tue, 04 Oct 2016 18:30:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9 Dental Health Info https://brandon.dental/dental-health-info Sat, 24 Oct 2015 17:43:06 +0000 https://brandon.dental/?p=1294 The post Dental Health Info appeared first on Brandon Dentist | 813-324-2834.

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  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) describes a variety of conditions that affect jaw muscles, temporomandibular joints and nerves associated with chronic facial pain. Symptoms may occur on one or both sides of the face, head or jaw, or develop after an injury. TMD affects more than twice as many women than men.    Updated: November 2008  &nbs […]

  • What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)?

    What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Fillings)?   Most people recognize dental amalgams as silver fillings. Dental amalgam is a mixture of mercury, silver, tin and copper. Mercury, which makes up about 50 percent of the compound, is used to bind the metals together and to provide a strong, hard, durable filling. After years of research, mercury has been found to be the only eleme... […]

  • What is Orofacial Pain?

    Orofacial pain includes a number of clinical problems involving the chewing (masticatory) muscles or temporomandibular joint. Problems can include temporomandibular joint discomfort; muscle spasms in the head, neck and jaw; migraines, cluster or frequent headaches; or pain with the teeth, face or jaw.   You swallow approximately 2,000 times per day, which causes the upper and lower teeth t... […]

  • What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)?

    What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)?   A composite filling is a tooth-colored plastic and glass mixture used to restore decayed teeth. Composites are also used for cosmetic improvements of the smile by changing the color of the teeth or reshaping disfigured teeth.   How is a composite placed?   Following preparation, the dentist ... […]

  • Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew?

    In our fast-paced lives, many of us may be eating in a hurry, taking giant bites of our food to get done quickly and on to the next task. Fast-food restaurants advertise giant burgers and sandwiches as a selling point, but often those super-sized delicacies are larger than a human mouth.   Taking bites that are too big to chew could be bad for your jaw and teeth, says the Academy of Genera... […]

  • The History of Dental Advances

    The History of Dental Advances   Many of the most common dental tools were used as early as the Stone Age. Thankfully, technology and continuing education have made going to the dentist a much more pleasant – and painless – experience. Here is a look at the history of dentistry's most common tools, and how they came to be vital components of our oral health care needs.   Where did t... […]

  • Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction

    Dry socket, the most common postoperative complication from tooth extractions, delays the normal healing process and results when the newly formed blood clot in the extraction site does not form correctly or is prematurely lost. This blood clot lays the foundation for new tissue and bone to develop over a two-month healing process.   Updated: October 2008   &nbs […]

  • Headaches and Jaw Pain? Check Your Posture!

    If you experience frequent headaches and pain in your lower jaw, check your posture and consult your dentist about temporomandibular disorder (TMD), recommends the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing dental education.   Poor posture places the spine in a position that causes stress to the jaw joint. When people slouch or hunch over... […]

  • Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist

    Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist   An online poll of 289 general dentists and consumers confirms the traditional stereotype that men are less likely to visit the dentist than their female counterparts, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), an organization of general dentists dedicated to continuing dental education.   Why? Nearly 45 percent... […]

  • Why is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Why is Oral Health Important for Men?   Men are less likely than women to take care of their physical health and, according to surveys and studies, their oral health is equally ignored. Good oral health recently has been linked with longevity. Yet, one of the most common factors associated with infrequent dental checkups is just being male. Men are less likely than women to seek preventive ... […]

  • What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

    What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?   Baby bottle tooth decay is caused by the frequent and long-term exposure of a child's teeth to liquids containing sugars. Among these liquids are milk, formula, fruit juice, sodas and other sweetened drinks. The sugars in these liquids pool around the infant's teeth and gums, feeding the bacteria in plaque. Every time a child consumes a sugary liquid, acid... […]

  • Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects

    Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects   It’s one of the hardest habits to break and can require a great deal of persuasion: Parents often struggle with weaning their child off of a pacifier.   There is much debate regarding the use of pacifiers, but there is evidence to show that there are both pros and cons, according to a study in the January/February 2007 issue of Gene... […]

  • Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay?

    Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay?   The average healthy adult visits the dentist twice a year. The average healthy 2-year-old has never been to the dentist. By kindergarten, 25 percent of children have never seen a dentist, yet dental decay is the single most common chronic childhood disease in America.   The culprit? A combination of misinformation about when a c... […]

  • When Should My Child First See a Dentist?

    When Should My Child First See a Dentist?   Your child's first visit to the dentist should happen before his or her first birthday. The general rule is six months after eruption of the first tooth. Taking your child to the dentist at a young age is the best way to prevent problems such as tooth decay, and can help parents learn how to clean their child's teeth and identify his or her fluori... […]

  • How Do I Care for My Child's Baby Teeth?

    How Do I Care for My Child’s Baby Teeth?   Though you lose them early in life, your primary teeth, also called baby teeth, are essential in the development and placement of your permanent teeth. Primary teeth maintain the spaces where permanent teeth will erupt and help develop proper speech patterns that would otherwise be difficult; without maintenance of these spaces, crowding and misali... […]

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Recognized Dental Specialties https://brandon.dental/recognized-dental-specialties Sat, 29 Nov 2014 04:06:13 +0000 https://brandon.dental/?p=711 Definitions of Recognized Dental Specialties Approved by the Council on Dental Education and Licensure, American Dental Association Dental Public Health: Dental public health is the science and art of preventing and controlling dental diseases and promoting dental health through organized community efforts. It is that form of dental practice which serves the community as a patient […]

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Definitions of Recognized Dental Specialties

Approved by the Council on Dental Education and Licensure, American Dental Association

Dental Public Health: Dental public health is the science and art of preventing and controlling dental diseases and promoting dental health through organized community efforts. It is that form of dental practice which serves the community as a patient rather than the individual. It is concerned with the dental health education of the public, with applied dental research, and with the administration of group dental care programs as well as the prevention and control of dental diseases on a community basis. (Adopted May 1976)

Endodontics: Endodontics is the branch of dentistry which is concerned with the morphology, physiology and pathology of the human dental pulp and periradicular tissues. Its study and practice encompass the basic and clinical sciences including biology of the normal pulp, the etiology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases and injuries of the pulp and associated periradicular conditions. (Adopted December 1983)

Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: Oral pathology is the specialty of dentistry and discipline of pathology that deals with the nature, identification, and management of diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. It is a science that investigates the causes, processes, and effects of these diseases. The practice of oral pathology includes research and diagnosis of diseases using clinical, radiographic, microscopic, biochemical, or other examinations.(Adopted May 1991)

Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology: Oral and maxillofacial radiology is the specialty of dentistry and discipline of radiology concerned with the production and interpretation of images and data produced by all modalities of radiant energy that are used for the diagnosis and management of diseases, disorders and conditions of the oral and maxillofacial region. (Adopted April 2001)

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Oral and maxillofacial surgery is the specialty of dentistry which includes the diagnosis, surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries and defects involving both the functional and esthetic aspects of the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region. (Adopted October 1990)

Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics: Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics is the dental specialty that includes the diagnosis, prevention, interception, and correction of malocclusion, as well as neuromuscular and skeletal abnormalities of the developing or mature orofacial structures. (Adopted April 2003)

Pediatric Dentistry: Pediatric Dentistry is an age-defined specialty that provides both primary and comprehensive preventive and therapeutic oral health care for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health care needs.(Adopted 1995)

Periodontics: Periodontics is that specialty of dentistry which encompasses the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the supporting and surrounding tissues of the teeth or their substitutes and the maintenance of the health, function and esthetics of these structures and tissues. (Adopted December 1992)

Prosthodontics: Prosthodontics is the dental specialty pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes.(Adopted April 2003)

source:  Definition of Recognized Specialties

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Socket Preservation https://brandon.dental/socket-preservation https://brandon.dental/socket-preservation#respond Mon, 24 Nov 2014 19:24:54 +0000 https://brandon.dental/?p=635 Preserving Your Socket Dental care is no longer just about extracting teeth and leaving gaps. It is about keeping the tooth socket firm and preserved, even without the tooth, for the success and natural looking appearance of tooth restorative procedures. Socket preservation enables us to have beautiful smile and to look youthful. It is widely […]

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Preserving Your Socket

Dental care is no longer just about extracting teeth and leaving gaps. It is about keeping the tooth socket firm and preserved, even without the tooth, for the success and natural looking appearance of tooth restorative procedures. Socket preservation enables us to have beautiful smile and to look youthful.

It is widely accepted among dentists that bone loss occurs rapidly after tooth extraction. This means the socket tissue that used to hold the tooth will collapse, resulting in insufficient bone volume and quality.

Eventual sinking of the gum lines causes functional and aesthetic problems when the patient decides to have dentures, bridges or the more pricey dental implants. All of these require a good jaw bone support and a healthily preserved socket.

Without solid bone foundation, inserted implants may be unstable; and a collapsed ridge clearly renders a poor aesthetic appearance. However, current methods to preserve sockets tend to have limitations. Alvelac™ aims to solve all that.

Socket Preservation is an indispensible procedure, the all-important, fundamental “must have” to bone loss prevention following tooth extraction. Jaw bones have the crucial function of propping up gum tissue and holding onto teeth to keep one’s smile looking beautiful and natural. After the tooth is removed, jaw bones have to be preserved to keep sockets in shape. Preservation as the name has it, is the maintenance of the socket, which is essentially the height and width of the gap that is left after the tooth is removed. It is done by placing a graft material or scaffold immediately into the socket of an extracted tooth to preserve bone height, width and density. Saving the bone thus allows for tooth restoration work to be done successfully.

Without sufficient bone quantity and quality, prosthetic dentistry that includes Dental Implants, Fixed Bridges and Dentures do not have a solid foundation to anchor on. And what turns out may not only be a dent in the wallet for nothing more than an ugly misfit of false replacements hanging above receding gums! Careful management of extraction sockets after tooth extraction prevents unsightly bone loss and provides a better cosmetic outcome for tooth replacement.

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The Ultimate Guide to Oral Health https://brandon.dental/ultimate-guide-oral-health Tue, 11 Nov 2014 03:10:36 +0000 https://brandon.dental/?p=575 Get health and fitness tips at Greatist.com

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The-Ultimate-Guide-to-Oral-Health

Get health and fitness tips at Greatist.com

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